Tag: Memorial

Kingston Avenue of Honour

The Kingston Avenue of Honour is a beautiful and significant site. Visit in autumn to see the stunning autumn colours, or in spring to see the stunning display of green. The Avenue of Honour was planted by the Creswick Shire as a living memorial to those who voluntarily enlisted from the Shire to serve God and the King. Dedicated nine years after cessation of hostilities in 1918, the Avenue of 286 trees planted is a separate acknowledgement of WWI service from the recognition contained on the Creswick Borough Council Honour Board, erected inside the Creswick Town Hall.

As the administrative centre of the Creswick Shire, the small town of Kingston was selected for the commencement of the memorial avenue, which lined the Kingston Road, south towards Springmount. Men and women from the shire who had enlisted were commemorated with an individual tree, and name plaques were allocated to each of these. The local community and the Red Cross Society were involved in numerous preparatory working bees as well as the planting of the avenue.

A Harcourt granite monument, in the form of an obelisk, was unveiled by Brigadier-General H E Elliot on 18 December 1927 to mark the Kingston end of the avenue.

Three Lost Children Reserve & Walk – 16 km’s | 6 hours one way

Stop at the three Lost Children Reserve to rest and contemplate. Learn about the story of the Three Lost Children or experience the walking trail.

A peaceful walk through the forest surrounding Daylesford, this 16km one way trail takes in gentle hills and beautiful scenery. The Three Lost Children Walking Trail commemorates the tragic story from Daylesford’s golden era when three small boys wandered away from their homes in 1867. Despite a massive and lengthy search effort by the united townsfolk, the boys were not found alive. The Three Lost Children walk follows the approximate route the boys walked and takes you through bush landscapes that were once active goldfields, and now are part of the Wombat State Forest and the Hepburn Regional Park. Along the walk you will see the remnants of gold mines, water races and tramways. Visit the memorial cairn on Wheelers Hill Rd, Musk and the gravesite and memorial at Daylesford Cemetery.

  • Sunrise to sunset.

Daylesford Avenue of Honour

Driving into Daylesford you will notice the spectacular sycamore trees lining the roads. These tress reflect the seasons, with stunning autumn colours, the bright greens of spring, the bare branches of winter and the muted tones of summer.

The Daylesford Avenue of Honour was planted to commemorate the First World War in 1918. They line Daylesford - Malmsbury Rd, a section of the Midland Hwy and Raglan Street.

  • Alway open

Drummond Avenue of Honour

The Drummond Avenue of Honour was planted by local residents to commemorate eleven fallen soldiers in the First World War.

There were originally 50 trees evenly divided along both sides of the Daylesford road, starting on the south corner of the intersection of the Lauriston road and heading south. It is believed that the original planting was in gums, but as they became grub infested, they were removed and replaced with Elms.

  • Sunrise to sunset.

Glenlyon Avenue of Honour

The Glenlyon Avenue of Honour lines the main street on Glenlyon and provides a magnificent shady canopy.

Visit in autumn to see the spectacular colour change. This avenue was planted to commemorate the First World War.

  • Always open

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